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fix, avoid, prevent, saggy balls, testicles, scrotum

fix, avoid, prevent, saggy balls, testicles, scrotum

A sagging scrotum is usually the result of a varicocele. A varicocele is a bundle of enlarged veins in a man’s scrotum, the sac that holds the two testicles. The veins are usually visible as lumps on the scrotum and may
feel like a bag of worms. The veins become enlarged because some of
the tiny valves inside the veins don’t close properly.

These valves normally prevent blood from draining backwards. When the valves fail, blood pools in the veins, causing them to swell. This increase in blood flood makes the testicles warmer. In an effort to cool down, the scrotum inches away from the body but still remains warm. Many men don’t realize they have a varicocele because the veins typically don’t hurt.

fix, avoid, prevent, saggy balls, testicles, scrotum

To repair sagging testicles caused by varicoceles requires microsurgery. The goal of the surgery is to locate the distended veins and tie them off which will prevent blood from pooling in the scrotum.

Varicocele surgery is done on an outpatient basis, and recovery is usually rapid. There is minimal discomfort. Once blood has stopped pooling in the scrotum the testicles cool down and the scrotum retreats back towards the body.

fix, avoid, prevent, saggy balls, testicles, scrotum
fix, avoid, prevent, saggy balls, testicles, scrotum

What is a Varicocele?

A sagging scrotum is usually the result of a varicocele. A varicocele is a bundle of enlarged veins in a man’s scrotum, the sac that holds the two testicles. The veins are usually visible as lumps on the scrotum and may feel like a bag of worms. The veins become enlarged because some of the tiny valves inside the veins don’t close properly. These valves normally prevent blood from draining backwards. When the valves fail, blood pools in the veins, causing them to swell. This increase in blood flood makes the testicles warmer. In an effort to cool down, the scrotum inches away from the body but still remains warm. Many men don’t realize they have a varicocele because the veins typically don’t hurt.

fix, avoid, prevent, saggy balls, testicles, scrotum

How Common Are Varicoceles?

About 20% of the male population has some kind of varicocele. Varicoceles are probably the result of very subtle genetic effects which, at present, remain unknown. Sometimes varicoceles begin to form in the teenage years, which is cause for concern. Untreated adolescent varicoceles can result in under-sized testicles, lower semen volumes, lower sperm counts, and more misshapen sperm. But varicoceles can happen at any age…and in general, the older you are the more likely you are to have a varicocele. Unfortunately, many doctors still don’t recognize the role that varicoceles play in male infertility and low testosterone, and may minimize the importance of having a varicocele corrected surgically.

How Are Varicoceles Diagnosed?

Since varicoceles often do not cause any pain or discomfort, they are usually discovered during routine physical exams, or exams associated with an infertility work-up. Physicians typically diagnose varicoceles by asking the man to stand up, take a deep breath, and bear down while the physician feels the scrotum above the testicle. If a varicocele is suspected, a physician may order a scrotal ultrasound test, but this is fairly uncommon because the classic “bag of worms” feel of a varicocele is so distinctive.

How Soon After The Surgery Can I Have Sex?

It is generally best to wait two weeks after the surgery before resuming any type of sexual activity.